For Writers

Tuesday’s Tweets — 05/30/2017

The long weekend is over for those of us in the US and it’s time to get back to work. Here are the links I shared on Tuesday via Twitter (@DancingOnCoals).

I began with one of my favorite speeches on creativity: Christoph Niemann’s terrific speech: How to Overcome the 3 Fears Every Creative Faces on 99U. I’ve shared it before, but it’s definitely worth sharing again.

On Confessions of a Mystery Novelist, Author Margot Kinberg discusses some crime writers whose private lives are quite mysterious in She’s Still a Mystery to Me

Andrea Balt offers 12 Vital Business Lessons for Dreamers & Artistpreneurs that are worth a look.

I know it doesn’t sound exciting, but judging from the rapidly increasing rate of wrong apostrophe usage, everybody on the planet should read this article from Daily Writing Tips: Use of the Apostrophe in Possessive Constructions.

Author Elizabeth Spann Craig offers us this article on description in fiction: Description: Letting Readers Fill in the Gaps.

Is something missing in your action novel? Read Action and Reaction from Ellen T. McKnight.

I was thinking a lot about plotting and how much I once hated the idea of outlining/plotting a novel before I wrote. Of course, that was also back before I ever wrote to the end of any manuscript, and certainly before I ever sold one. I made up my own system oOrganic Plottingf “organic” plotting while writing my very first completed novel, which earned me representation from the first agent who saw it and sold in a 3-book contract to the first publisher to which it was submitted. I decided I must have done something right, and started sharing my plotting ideas with others. Even all these books later, I find that my writing experience of any novel is better (read: smoother) if I use the organic plotting method, either before I write the first draft, or afterward, before I launch into revisions. If you’re interested, find out more here.

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